Friday, August 17, 2012

Grandma's Comforter

I'm going to try to do a quick post here.  It's supposed to be mid-90's today, the office is upstairs and in about an hour the sun will be on the window and it will be almost as hot as the face of the sun in here!

Anywho, this post is to show Nifty Quilts my Grandmother's comforter, which is similar to the one she found last week at Goodwill.  Once I got this out and really looked at it, it's a much simpler pattern than the comforter she found, but there are some similarities in the fabrics and the stitching.


Here's an overall picture of the comforter. This past spring when I went to visit my sister, she gave me this comforter that my Dad's mother made.  We never knew Grandma, as she passed away before I was born.  Mom always had this around and we often used it to cuddle in when we were sick.  I hadn't seen this comforter in many, many years.  I was somewhat surprised to find that this isn't as big as I remembered it.  Isn't it funny how we do that?


Here are 4 blocks.  On Grandma's comforter is the same embroidered stitching on every seam, just like on Nifty's, with what appears to be perle cotton.  Also, Grandma tied all over with wool yarn - the same pattern all across the quilt.


Here's the back, with the silky fabric.  It seems like rayon to me, but I'm not positive.  It's gotten pretty faded at the edges.


A closeup of the fabrics.  The plaid is a twill fabric (unknown content, but I don't think wool), and the dark blue seems to be a lightweight wool.  


Here's the only "make-do" block in the comforter.  The patch is a dark green velvet, which I think my Mom added.  It looks to me like the fabric my sister used to make a prom dress one year.  In Real Life, it's not such a stark contrast to the rest of the fabrics.  Maybe you can see that there is knife-edge finish on the comforter too.


Here's a little peek into the inside of the comforter.  The poor old thing is getting a few holes in it!  Anyway, this looks to me like a cotton batting that is encased in what appears to be cheesecloth!  The batting doesn't go all the way to the edge of the quilt, but the "cheesecloth" does - all the way around the quilt.  Interesting, no?  I've never seen batting quite like this.

I don't know when my Grandma made this comforter, but it had to be sometime between 1903 when she married and the late 1940's when she passed away.  I suspect she made this in her later years.  Any help in dating this would be very welcome!

Hope you enjoy this, Nifty!

OK, now I'm going to try find a cool spot to spend the afternoon.

6 comments:

  1. Oh! This is so exciting! It does have the same embroidery, the same silky back, the same wool ties and the same knife edge. There's also some plaid and lightweight wool in mine. I don't know about the batting in mine. It feels like it could be an old blanket. I just LOVE that make-do block!! All the other blocks are so perfectly cut. I would tend figure I couldn't make the quilt that big if I didn't have enough fabric for all the blocks. Or I'd use another fabric. Her make-do block is charming in so many ways. How lucky you are to have the memories of using this quilt as a child, and to have this remnant of your grandmother's life. Thank you for showing it!

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  2. I LOVE this - what a treasure!!!!

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  3. So sweet that you have this quilt. I have a quilt my g'ma made that one of my sisters and I used to fight over who got to sleep under. I am always so amazed at how small it is compared to what I remember from my youth.:)

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  4. I love this post. I have some comforters that my hubby's grandmother made from his grandfather's old suits. Now I want to dig them out and take another look. BTW, hubby said it's pretty hot in WA and it made me think of you. Stay cool!

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  5. What a great show and tell. It's so interesting to read about the fabrics, stitches and the interesting batting.

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  6. I've heard of wrapping your batting in cheese cloth. Especially a wool batting. It's supposed to help it stay "together".

    Lisa in Minnesota

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